Stereotyping Valentine’s Day

  This year for Valentine’s Day not a lot of people are going to celebrate. This could be because of how expensive and sexist this holiday truly is. Though, Valentine’s Day wasn’t always sexist and expensive.

  Valentine’s Day goes back to the Roman Festival of Lupercalia, a celebration on February 15. Pope Gelasius later declared it as a Christian feast on February 14. Thus, Valentine’s Day was born. Over the years, people started exchanging gifts.

  Personally, I love Valentine’s day, but does everyone else? More people than not think that Valentine’s Day is an over-rated holiday.

  Elissa Sanci on Thought Catalog said, “Valentine’s Day is a headache—just another expensive day to plan. We spend serious money for the holidays, birthdays and anniversaries, and now, we’re also expected to pull out the wallet for this random day in February.”

  According to the National Retail Federation, only about 55% of Americans celebrate Valentine’s Day, but the couples who do will spend an average of $146.84. Valentine’s Day spending was expected to hit $19.7 billion last year.

  Valentine’s Day doesn’t have to be this way. An easy way to get through this holiday is to buy chocolates. Valentine’s Day chocolate can be fairly cheap. A Russell Stover box of chocolate (and teddy bear) cost $3.   If you’re planning to get your partner flowers, they can cost up to $100.  This year for Valentine’s Day, go with what everyone loves: chocolate.

  If you’re single for Valentine’s Day you can always go out with another single friend. You can make the most out of this Valentine’s day this year. Let’s the stereotypes of Valentine’s Day this year.

Hayden Koele, Staff Reporter

newspaper

Two friends hanging out on Valentines Day. PhotoCo: Edie Valdez

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